Sa-OR-S111-3 - The Relationships Between Emotional Culture, Emotional Dissonance And Emotional Labor: A Cross-National Study

Track:
Emotional labor
What:
Oral Presentation
Part of:
When:
Saturday May 20   09:30 AM to 09:45 AM (15 minutes)
Where:
S1.67
Discussion:
0
 
Emotion in the workplace
Emotional labor
Sa-OR-S111-3
The Relationships Between Emotional Culture, Emotional Dissonance and Emotional Labor: A Cross-National Study
S. Ceylan 1,*, A. Gökalp 2, A. E. Nixon 3, G. Ruiz de Huydobro, E. Eatough 4, C. E. Nelson  5
1Department of Psychology, Hacettepe University, 2Department of Psychology , Middle East Technical University , Ankara, Turkey, 3Atkinson Graduate School of Management, Willamette University, Salem, Oregon, 4Department of Psychology , The City University of New York Baruch College, New York , 5Department of Psychology , University of South Florida, Tampa, United States
 
Content: Purpose
Literature on cross-cultural differences on emotional labor has documented that country  (e.g., Allen, Diefendorff, Ma, 2014), cultural values (e.g., Nixon, Ceylan, Alabak, & Nelson, 2016), and organizational culture (Grandey, Fisk, & Steiner, 2005) moderate the relationship between emotional labor strageties and various outcomes. The current study extends previous research by investigating the dual moderator effects of emotional culture and country on the relationships between emotional labor (i.e., deep and surface acting) and employee strain (i.e., emotional strain, job satisfaction, turnover intentions).
Design/Methodology
Data were collected from customer service employees working at least 20 hours per week from Turkey (n = 328) and the U.S. (n = 306).
Results
Although the relationships between deep acting and employee strain was same across two countries, the negative relationships between surface acting with emotional strain and turnover intentions were stronger in the U.S. compared to the Turkish sample. The results of the hierarchical regression analyses confirmed that  both emotional culture and country moderated the relationships between surface acting with emotional strain and job satisfaction, but not turnover intentions.
Limitations
The cross-sectional and self-report design of the study might suggest that we are unable to assume causality, and shared bias affected the relationships among variables.
Research/Practical Implications
These results imply that both national and organizational culture impacts the effect of emotional labor on employees.
Originality/Value
To our knowledge, this study is the first to measure emotion culture and investigate the double moderator effect of emotion culture and country on the relationships between study variables.
 
 
 
 
 

 
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