TH-P01-013-interactive - Organizational justice, job satisfaction and counterproductive behaviour: A Job Demands and Resources (JD-R) theory study with Social Workers.

Track:
Coping and social support
What:
Interactive Poster Presentation
When:
1 hour 30 minutes
Where:
O'Brien Foyer
Discussion:
0
 
Employee stress and burnout
Coping and social support
TH-P01-013-interactive
Organizational justice, job satisfaction and counterproductive behaviour: A Job Demands and Resources (JD-R) theory study with Social Workers.
A. Osca 1,*, B. Urien 2
1UNED, Madrid, 2Universidad Pública de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain
 
Content:              Our purpose is to examine the role of organizational justice in the framework of the job demands and resources (JD-R) theory to predict job satisfaction and counterproductive behaviours (i.e. deception, misuse of time, or peers mistreatment) in a sample of 213 Spanish social workers. Extant literature found that organizational justice influences mental health directly and by exerting a buffering effect. There is also broad consensus on the burnout-prone characteristics of social work practice and its importance to predict negative job outcomes.
            Hypotheses were tested by hierarchal regression analysis including direct and buffering effects. After controlling socio-demographic variables, results confirmed direct effects and the buffering effect of organizational justice on the relationship between demands and counterproductive behaviour but not in the case of job satisfaction.
            Further studies should examine why organizational justice does not buffer the negative effect of demands on job satisfaction; should analyse in depth relationships among these variables overtime and should replicate this study at the team level.
            Results strengthen the role of this organizational and team antecedent on counterproductive behaviour in social work. Since the most-followed line of ethical behaviour studies place most of the pressure over the social worker as an individual, this study contributes to analyse the role of organisational justice in the framework of JD-R theory to predict counterproductive behaviour in social workers wellbeing and effectiveness. Social workers ethical training could benefit from these findings.
 
Key words: Organizational justice, Job demands-resources theory, Social work, Counterproductive behaviour, Job satisfaction.
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
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