TH-P01-014-interactive - Conservation of Resources by Networking: a Daily Diary Study

Track:
Coping and social support
What:
Interactive Poster Presentation
When:
1 hour 30 minutes
Where:
O'Brien Foyer
Discussion:
0
Employee stress and burnout
Coping and social support
TH-P01-014-interactive
Conservation of Resources by Networking: a Daily Diary Study
L. M. Wingender 1,*, H.-G. Wolff 1
1University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany
 
Content: Purpose:
Prior research primarily employed a between-person perspective, linking individuals’ typical extent of networking to long-term benefits, particularly career success. Based upon conservation of resources theory (COR), we suggest that a within-person perspective yields important insights into how costs and benefits accrue from networking.
Design/Methodology:
We conducted a diary study with 169 employees. Participants completed one general survey and two daily surveys (after work and before bedtime, N = 1317) for five consecutive work days.
Results:
Daily networking showed considerable within-person variation (ICC = .37). It was positively associated with job resources, engagement, performance, and job satisfaction. Moreover, networking reduced emotional exhaustion and increased positive affect. Regarding costs, networking marginally increased work-life conflict.
Limitations:
The diary study design provides a closer look at daily networking processes. However, it does not indicate the immediate effect of networking. To capture immediate effects (e.g. depletion of self-regulation), future studies may use an experience sampling design. 
Research/Practical Implications:
In line with COR, daily networking represents a resource that helps obtaining further resources (resource caravans). Therefore, regarding the cost-benefit ratio of daily networking individuals should be encouraged to engage in daily networking.
Originality/Value:
By employing a within-person perspective on networking, we gain a more precise understanding on how networking behaviors translate into resources. Whilst prior studies have focused on work-related criteria, we also examine how networking affects well-being. Drawing on COR, we go beyond the predominant focus on networking benefits and take a look at potential costs associated with the pursuit of resources by networking.
 
 
 

My Schedule

Add to Your Schedule