TH-P01-043 - When do negative acts reflect experienced workplace bullying? Identifying optimal cut-off points on the Short-Negative Act Questionnaire

Track:
Bullying and harassment
What:
Poster Presentation
When:
3 hours 30 minutes
Where:
O'Brien Foyer
Discussion:
0
 
Conflict in organizations
Bullying and harassment
TH-P01-043
When do negative acts reflect experienced workplace bullying? Identifying optimal cut-off points on the Short-Negative Act Questionnaire
P. M. Conway 1,*, A. Høgh 1, E. G. Mikkelsen 2, K. Nabe-Nielsen 3, M. B. Grynderup 3, R.  Rugulies 4, P. Roger 5 6, Å. M. Hansen 3 4
1Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, 2Gemzøe Consult, Aarhus, 3Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, 4National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark, 5Department of Psychology, 6Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
 
Content: Purpose
To identify the optimal cut-off points on the Short Negative Act Questionnaire (S-NAQ) for classifying targets of occasional and frequent workplace bullying.
Methodology
Using occasional and frequent self-reported workplace bullying as reference criteria, we performed two Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analyses on a sample of 4,857 employees from the Danish MODENA study (2011). We tested the criterion validity of these cut-offs for diagnosed mental disorders (depression and anxiety) on a subsample (n=325) interviewed with the Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry.  
Results
The two cut-offs on the S-NAQ were >11 and >15 for the two reference standards. These cut-offs showed high classification accuracy (Area Under the Curve=0.89 and 0.93) and presented good sensitivity (84.8%>88%) and specificity (77.4%>94.7%). In the fully adjusted model, both the first (OR=2.07, 95% CI=1.03-4.16) and the second cut-off (OR=3.06, 95% CI=1.34-6.97) were statistically significantly associated with diagnosed depression but not with  diagnosed anxiety. 
Limitations
We cannot establish the predictive validity of the cut-off points obtained, since employees with mental diagnoses could not be excluded at baseline.
Practical implications
The two cut-offs can be adopted when using the S-NAQ to identify probable targets of occasional and frequent bullying. The S-NAQ can provide useful information about  negative behaviours  that should be addressed in the prevention of bullying.      
Value
This is the first study testing empirical cut-offs for being a target of bullying on the S-NAQ.
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

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