TH-P01-068 - The Deviance Cycle: Abusive supervision and knowledge hiding

Track:
Counterproductive Work Behavior
What:
Poster Presentation
When:
3 hours 30 minutes
Where:
O'Brien Foyer
Discussion:
0
Conflict in organizations
Counterproductive Work Behavior
TH-P01-068
The Deviance Cycle: Abusive supervision and knowledge hiding
D. Zweig*, K. Scott 1
1Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada
 
Content: Purpose
Knowledge hiding, or intentional attempts by employees to conceal or withhold knowledge from others when requested (Connelly et al., 2012), occurs within a dyadic relationship.  Previous research on knowledge hiding has not explicitly explored this form of deviance in reaction to supervisory behavior. This paper examines employee perceptions of supervisory abuse over time. We hypothesize that employee perceptions of supervisory abuse will promote knowledge hiding, which will lead to further perceptions of supervisory abuse.
 
Design/Methodology
Employed participants (N = 311; 57% male; Xage = 45.73) completed measures of abusive supervision and knowledge hiding at three points over a 7-month time period.
 
Results
We used longitudinal structural equation modeling with AMOS 22. Over time, abusive supervision predicted each facet of knowledge hiding; cross-lagged relationships from abusive supervision to knowledge hiding were significant. However, cross-lagged relationships between knowledge hiding and abusive supervision were only significant from Time 1-Time 2, thus knowledge hiding appears only to predict abusive supervision in the short term.
 
Limitations
We only sampled participants over three time periods. Additionally, data was only gathered from a single source.
 
Research/Practical Implications
We demonstrate that abusive supervision elicits knowledge hiding behaviors by subordinates, and in the short-term, knowledge hiding elicits supervisory abuse in response. Knowledge hiding and abusive supervision appear to go hand-in-hand and can lead to a cycle of deviance that is difficult to prevent.
Originality/Value
This paper is the first to examine knowledge hiding in response to supervisory behavior, and adds to the growing evidence that deviance begets deviance. 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
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