TH-P01-074 - Cultural aspects of knowledge hiding: The combined role of prosocial motivation, cultural tightness and collectivism

Track:
Counterproductive Work Behavior
What:
Poster Presentation
When:
3 hours 30 minutes
Where:
O'Brien Foyer
Discussion:
0
 
Conflict in organizations
Counterproductive Work Behavior
TH-P01-074
Cultural aspects of knowledge hiding:
The combined role of prosocial motivation, cultural tightness and collectivism
 
K. Babič 1,*, C. E. Connelly 2, M. Černe 1, A. Dysvik 3, P. Zhang 4
1University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia, 2McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada, 3BI Norwegian Business School, Oslo, Norway, 4Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China
 
Content:  
Purpose
The aim of this paper is to deepen our understanding of the role of national culture in predicting knowledge hiding. Specifically, we consider a three-way interaction between prosocial motivation, collectivism (i.e., the content of cultural dimensions) and tightness (i.e., the intensity) in explaining knowledge hiding in organizations.
Design/Methodology
We conducted two field studies: working professionals in Slovenia (n=124) and China (n=253), (n=377). Data were analyzed using a series of moderated hierarchical regression analyses including three-way interaction: collectivism, tightness and prosocial motivation.
Results
As hypothesized, prosocial motivation is negatively related to knowledge hiding. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the most knowledge hiding occurs when there is a combination of low levels of each of the three factors: low levels of prosocial motivation, low tightness and low levels of collectivism.
Limitations
Our cross-sectional design limits our ability to infer causation.
Research/Practical Implications
Our results have important theoretical and conceptual implications for research on knowledge management and cross-cultural organizational behavior. Although prior research on knowledge sharing has considered some contextual factors, the national culture perspective has been absent from the research on knowledge hiding. Our findings offer practical guidelines on how managers can prevent or minimize knowledge hiding in organizations.
Originality/Value
This is the first paper to examine the role of national culture in predicting knowledge hiding.
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
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