TH-P01-080 - Linking Surface Acting in Interactions with Customers, Coworkers, and Supervisors and Employee Well-Being.

Track:
Emotional labor
What:
Poster Presentation
When:
3 hours 30 minutes
Where:
O'Brien Foyer
Discussion:
0
Emotion in the workplace
Emotional labor
TH-P01-080
Linking Surface Acting in Interactions with Customers, Coworkers, and Supervisors and Employee Well-Being.
C. Holmvall 1,*, L. Bryson 1
1Saint Mary's University, Halifax, Canada
 
Content: Purpose: Regulating emotions is essential in many customer-service jobs.  Faking one’s emotions (i.e., surface acting) is especially problematic for employee outcomes (Gabriel et al., 2015).  Research has primarily investigated surface acting in interactions with customers, yet, employees may also act in interactions with cowokers and supervisors. We reasoned that surface acting in interactions with each group (customers, coworkers, supervisors) may lead to feelings of inauthenticity (Gabriel et al., 2015), which would be associated with lower job satisfaction and greater negative emotions at work. Design/Methodology: We used a correlational survey design with 204 customer-service employees. Surface acting was measured with items from Chu and Murrmann (2006; alphas > .90).  Job satisfaction was assessed with a shortened-version of Brayfield and Rothe’s (1951) measure (alpha = .89) and negative affective well-being was measured with Van Katwyk and colleagues’ scale (2000; alpha = .89). Results: Regression analyses found that surface acting toward customers was the only unique (negative) predictor of job satisfaction (p < .01) and surface acting toward customers and supervisors uniquely (positively) predicted negative affective well-being (ps < .05). Limitations:  Our data are correlational and thus preclude causal statements. Research/Practical Implications: Our data suggest that negative implications of surface acting may extend to other interactions beyond customers. Faking emotions in interactions with supervisors was also associated with more negative affect at work.  Originality/Value: Our study considers a wider array of targets of emotional regulation in customer-service jobs and highlights surface acting in interactions with supervisors as potentially negatively impacting employee well-being.
 

My Schedule

Add to Your Schedule