TH-P01-099 - Effort-reward imbalance as a mediator of the relationships between recovery and fatigue in nurses

Track:
Recovery and unwinding
What:
Poster Presentation
When:
3 hours 30 minutes
Where:
O'Brien Foyer
Discussion:
0
 
Employee stress and burnout
Recovery and unwinding
TH-P01-099
Effort-reward imbalance as a mediator of the relationships between recovery and fatigue in nurses
T. C. D'Oliveira 1,*
1University of East London, London, United Kingdom
 
Content: Purpose
The consequences of an increasing diversification of working time patterns associated with the provision of health care services on a 24/7 basis need to be closely monitored to minimise the risks for health, safety and social well-being of nurses.
The main objective of this paper was to:
        1. Analyse the mediating effect of effort-reward imbalance (ERI) in the relationship between recovery and fatigue.
        2. Explore the moderating effect of working hours in the relationship between recovery and fatigue.
        3. Study the benefits of leisure activities in the fatigue and recovery levels experienced by nurses.
Design/Methodology
A total of 151 nurses completed the CIS by Bültmann et al. (2000), the Recovery Experience Questionnaire by Sonnentag and Fritz (2007) and the ERI by Siegrist et al (2004).
Results
SEM was used to analyse the mediating role of ERI and working hours as a moderator of the relationship between recovery and fatigue. A MANOVA was used to test the benefits of leisure activities.
Limitations
A longitudinal approach is needed and information on the informal practices adopted by nurses (e.g., changing shifts) to further understand how to prevent the adverse effects of occupational fatigue.
Research/Practical Implications
The strong relationship between recovery experiences and fatigue highlights the relevance of a recovery strategy whereby workers may be empowered to contribute to a personalised recovery hygiene.
Originality/Value
The paper expands the existing knowledge on the effects of flexible working time in nurses, highlights the limitations of “time on task” strategies and emphasizes the importance an organisational recovery management system.
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
Participant
King's College London

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