TH-P02-007-interactive - Engagement and exhaustion among employees in non-profit organisations: Role of ethical leadership

Track:
Leadership and followership
What:
Interactive Poster Presentation
When:
1 hour 30 minutes
Where:
O'Brien Foyer
Discussion:
0
 
Leadership and management
Leadership and followership
TH-P02-007-interactive
Engagement and exhaustion among employees in non-profit organisations: Role of ethical leadership
D. Jeske 1,*, J. Rivers 2, N. Thompson 2
1University College Cork, Cork, Ireland, 2Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom
 
Content: Purpose: Building on previous leadership and well-being research, the aims of the present study were to investigate the relationship between ethical leadership and employee well-being (work engagement and emotional exhaustion) within a non-profit setting. We also considered the role of trust as a potential mediator.
Methodology: Cross-sectional survey data was collected using an online survey from 137 employees from different Student Unions.
Results: Path model analysis revealed that trust in supervisor partially mediated the effects of ethical leadership and work engagement and emotional exhaustion. While trust increased work engagement and reduced emotional exhaustion, ethical leadership also had a significant indirect effect on both outcomes. An interaction between employee dedication and ratings for supervisor’s ethical leadership suggested that more dedicated staff are less emotionally exhausted if their managers scored highly on ethical leadership. Leadership had less impact on emotional exhaustion when the employees felt less dedicated.
Limitations: The results are based on self-report and a cross-sectional sample.
Implications: If dedication to the job declines, this might be an early warning sign that the employee may be insufficiently supported at work, and thus prone to more stress in the future. Managers need to be able to identify early signs of over-commitment as this might trigger emotional exhaustion, and maybe even burnout. Researchers may wish to consider the role of dedication in relation to (over-)commitment and social identification.
Originality: This study adds to the limited literature on ethical leadership in non-profit settings.
 
 
 
 
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