Whitfield Diffie

Participates in 2 items
Whitfield Diffie is an American cryptographer and one of the pioneers of public-key cryptography, along with Martin Hellman and Ralph Merkle.

Diffie and Hellman's 1976 paper "New Directions in Cryptography" introduced a radically new method of distributing cryptographic keys, that helped solve key distribution, a fundamental problem in cryptography. Their technique became known as Diffie-Hellman key exchange. The article stimulated the almost immediate public development of a new class of encryption algorithms, the asymmetric key algorithms. According to his biographer Stephen Levy, "From the moment Diffie and Hellman published their findings..., the National Security Agency's crypto monopoly was effectively terminated. ... Every company, every citizen now had routine access to the sorts of cryptographic technology that not many years ago ranked alongside the atom bomb as a source of power."

After a long career at Sun Microsystems, where he became a Sun Fellow, Diffie served for two and a half years as Vice President for Information Security and Cryptography at the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers. He is currently a consulting scholar at the Freeman Spogli Institute's Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University. Together with Martin Hellman, Diffie won the 2015 Turing Award, widely considered the most prestigious award in the field of computer science. In 2011, he was named a Fellow of the Computer History Museum "for his work, with Martin Hellman and Ralph Merkle, on public key cryptography." Diffie was elected a Foreign Member of the Royal Society in 2017.

Sessions in which Whitfield Diffie participates

Friday August 17, 2018

1:00 PM
1:00 PM
3:00 PM
3:00 PM